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  • marta5
    replied
    Originally posted by marta5 View Post
    Traveling and doing activities with our animals is very important, I usually go on a getaway with my dog and practice our favorite sport, climbing. He also loves it and whenever he can, he accompanies us, if you dare to practice this exciting sport, I encourage you to visit this shop climbing holds ([url]www.euroholds.com/en/29-climbing-holds[/url]).

    Traveling and doing activities with our animals is very important, I usually go on a getaway with my dog and practice our favorite sport, climbing. He also loves it and whenever he can, he accompanies us.

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  • marta5
    replied
    Traveling and doing activities with our animals is very important, I usually go on a getaway with my dog and practice our favorite sport, climbing. He also loves it and whenever he can, he accompanies us, if you dare to practice this exciting sport, I encourage you to visit this shop climbing holds [url=https://www.euroholds.com/en/29-climbing-holds[/url]

    Leave a comment:


  • AnimalsHealthToo
    replied
    Remember that service animals need training and certificates, emotional support animals don't need that. They just need documents from doctors that confirms that the animal is a registered emotional support animal It's common to confuse service animals, therapy animals, and ESAs with each other. Just remember that ESAs don't need training. Also, in terms of the law, service animals and therapy animals have a much more elevated status compared to an ESA, which is only limited to housing or travel locations. So, if a landlord tries to deny an ESA request, the tenant and allow HUD ([url]https://www.hud.gov[/url]) to step in via discriminatory laws.

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  • Eva Woods
    replied
    Traveling with your emotional support animal without any additional fee or costs is allowed by airline carriers only if you have an ESA letter. However, you have to comply with some other requirements of the airline and the country in question. All airlines require your ESA to be well behaved in public and calm on the plane. You can get an at-home dog training guide and train your dog yourself in no time. This will not only save money but also ensure you have a pleasant experience flying with your dog.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kenneth J. Burge
    replied
    Re: Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

    Originally posted by LILY View Post
    Hello,
    I will be traveling with my dog as an Emotional Support Animal, but have a lot of anxiety about her flying. She is a dog I will be bringing back with me from Costa Rica and has never flown before/lives a very free life here ie: without a leash, has not been in a crate before, and hasn't been exposed to high amounts of people/inside busy buildings before. I am very nervous she will freak out in the cabin and bark/whine. She is a medium sized dog and has a very loud bark. We are relocating back to the states and are planning to bring her and flights are around 7 hours with a layover in between. Does anyone have any experience traveling with a larger Emotional Support Animal in the cabin (uncaged) and what do you do about barking/their anxiety? Since she has never been in this situation I really don't know how she'll respond (maybe fine?).
    Also, i've considered cargo but I really don't want to do this as I think that would be even more terrifying for her to be put in a crate/separated from us. Plus, I've heard many horror stories about traveling cargo.
    Any insight into this would be very helpful, pros/cons of riding cabin (again, note, she is NOT a small dog and will be just on a leash sitting at our feet) or riding in cargo in a crate.
    Thanks!
    Hello Lily!
    It all depends on you. It's all about how you are training your dog to behave at a public place. It would be better if you make him learn to stay among people before you can take him along for such long time. As travelling for 7 long hours may make your dog to feel uncomfortable and may left him irritated. So, it would be really better if you make him comfortable and be prepared for this travel.

    Leave a comment:


  • admin
    replied
    Re: Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

    You can try a mild sedative, but you will need to train your dog. It will take some time to get your dog accustomed to being around people in confined spaces.

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  • johnexplo
    replied
    Re: Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

    how I Calming down my dog

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  • admin
    replied
    Re: Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

    Lily - because emotional support animals, unlike service animals, are not trained as a part of their "certification," you are responsible for their behavior. The airlines will not tolerate behavior that will affect other passengers or cabin operations. You will need to be proactive in socializing your dog in public places to observe its behavior and decide whether it can behave while sitting/lying at your feet for 7 hours. If this cannot happen, then you need to work on acclimating your dog to a pet crate.
    Susan

    Leave a comment:


  • LILY
    started a topic Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

    Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

    Hello,
    I will be traveling with my dog as an Emotional Support Animal, but have a lot of anxiety about her flying. She is a dog I will be bringing back with me from Costa Rica and has never flown before/lives a very free life here ie: without a leash, has not been in a crate before, and hasn't been exposed to high amounts of people/inside busy buildings before. I am very nervous she will freak out in the cabin and bark/whine. She is a medium sized dog and has a very loud bark. We are relocating back to the states and are planning to bring her and flights are around 7 hours with a layover in between. Does anyone have any experience traveling with a larger Emotional Support Animal in the cabin (uncaged) and what do you do about barking/their anxiety? Since she has never been in this situation I really don't know how she'll respond (maybe fine?).
    Also, i've considered cargo but I really don't want to do this as I think that would be even more terrifying for her to be put in a crate/separated from us. Plus, I've heard many horror stories about traveling cargo.
    Any insight into this would be very helpful, pros/cons of riding cabin (again, note, she is NOT a small dog and will be just on a leash sitting at our feet) or riding in cargo in a crate.
    Thanks!
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