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  • Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

    Hello,
    I will be traveling with my dog as an Emotional Support Animal, but have a lot of anxiety about her flying. She is a dog I will be bringing back with me from Costa Rica and has never flown before/lives a very free life here ie: without a leash, has not been in a crate before, and hasn't been exposed to high amounts of people/inside busy buildings before. I am very nervous she will freak out in the cabin and bark/whine. She is a medium sized dog and has a very loud bark. We are relocating back to the states and are planning to bring her and flights are around 7 hours with a layover in between. Does anyone have any experience traveling with a larger Emotional Support Animal in the cabin (uncaged) and what do you do about barking/their anxiety? Since she has never been in this situation I really don't know how she'll respond (maybe fine?).
    Also, i've considered cargo but I really don't want to do this as I think that would be even more terrifying for her to be put in a crate/separated from us. Plus, I've heard many horror stories about traveling cargo.
    Any insight into this would be very helpful, pros/cons of riding cabin (again, note, she is NOT a small dog and will be just on a leash sitting at our feet) or riding in cargo in a crate.
    Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

    Lily - because emotional support animals, unlike service animals, are not trained as a part of their "certification," you are responsible for their behavior. The airlines will not tolerate behavior that will affect other passengers or cabin operations. You will need to be proactive in socializing your dog in public places to observe its behavior and decide whether it can behave while sitting/lying at your feet for 7 hours. If this cannot happen, then you need to work on acclimating your dog to a pet crate.
    Susan

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    • #3
      Re: Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

      how I Calming down my dog

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      • #4
        Re: Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

        You can try a mild sedative, but you will need to train your dog. It will take some time to get your dog accustomed to being around people in confined spaces.

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        • #5
          Re: Traveling with an Emotional Support Animal

          Originally posted by LILY View Post
          Hello,
          I will be traveling with my dog as an Emotional Support Animal, but have a lot of anxiety about her flying. She is a dog I will be bringing back with me from Costa Rica and has never flown before/lives a very free life here ie: without a leash, has not been in a crate before, and hasn't been exposed to high amounts of people/inside busy buildings before. I am very nervous she will freak out in the cabin and bark/whine. She is a medium sized dog and has a very loud bark. We are relocating back to the states and are planning to bring her and flights are around 7 hours with a layover in between. Does anyone have any experience traveling with a larger Emotional Support Animal in the cabin (uncaged) and what do you do about barking/their anxiety? Since she has never been in this situation I really don't know how she'll respond (maybe fine?).
          Also, i've considered cargo but I really don't want to do this as I think that would be even more terrifying for her to be put in a crate/separated from us. Plus, I've heard many horror stories about traveling cargo.
          Any insight into this would be very helpful, pros/cons of riding cabin (again, note, she is NOT a small dog and will be just on a leash sitting at our feet) or riding in cargo in a crate.
          Thanks!
          Hello Lily!
          It all depends on you. It's all about how you are training your dog to behave at a public place. It would be better if you make him learn to stay among people before you can take him along for such long time. As travelling for 7 long hours may make your dog to feel uncomfortable and may left him irritated. So, it would be really better if you make him comfortable and be prepared for this travel.

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          • #6
            Traveling with your emotional support animal without any additional fee or costs is allowed by airline carriers only if you have an ESA letter. However, you have to comply with some other requirements of the airline and the country in question. All airlines require your ESA to be well behaved in public and calm on the plane. You can get an at-home dog training guide and train your dog yourself in no time. This will not only save money but also ensure you have a pleasant experience flying with your dog.

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            • #7
              Remember that service animals need training and certificates, emotional support animals don't need that. They just need documents from doctors that confirms that the animal is a registered emotional support animal It's common to confuse service animals, therapy animals, and ESAs with each other. Just remember that ESAs don't need training. Also, in terms of the law, service animals and therapy animals have a much more elevated status compared to an ESA, which is only limited to housing or travel locations. So, if a landlord tries to deny an ESA request, the tenant and allow HUD ([url]https://www.hud.gov[/url]) to step in via discriminatory laws.

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              • #8
                Hi Lily, I have traveled with my dog internationally few times.
                To help calm him out I have used the CozyVest Anxiety Vest for Dogs on him and he was basically sleeping throughout the flight.
                Hope it helps.
                Anxiety Vest for Dogs with over 80% Success Rate, we can help Calm your Dog or Cat's Anxiety during Fireworks, Thunderstorms, Travel, Separation, Travel & more.
                Last edited by oren; 12-21-2020, 08:34 PM.

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                • #9
                  For many people who’d want to travel with their pet, things are not always as straightforward. Not long ago, no airlines allowed pets in the cabin. But, the rules have changed, and with a few guidelines, you can carry your furry friends with you while traveling.

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                  • #10
                    [url]https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelgoldstein/2020/12/04/airlines-get-dot-ban-on-emotional-support-animals-for-now/?sh=2a83340b3f9f[/url]

                    You can check the new DoT rules as they have changed recently. As far as your dog's anxiety is concerned, I don't think you can use Benadryl for flights. However, there are several other products available. You can check them online on Petcarerx or Chewys websites.

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                    • #11
                      Some airlines take dogs both onboard if they are small enough to fit in a carrier under the seat in front of you. (that's pretty small)
                      You can also fly on some airlines in an airline-approved kennel. Each airline has its specifications and can be found on their website.
                      Some things to take into consideration: If at all possible, take a direct flight. Transferring a dog from flight to flight could have many problems arise. Flight delay and other airline transfer issues. If you've ever lost a bag on multiple flights, it's entirely possible with your dog.
                      Time of year and temperature. Though the cargo area is pressurized and supposedly heated, hot conditions or cold conditions could be a fatal mistake to travel with your dog by air.
                      Feeding should be done several hours before the flight, so the dog has time to relieve him/herself before being kenneled for the flight.
                      Ensure the crate so the dog cannot jar the crate open and escape and provide water attached to the door. Most airlines that fly dogs have a list of requirements you can follow as a guideline.
                      Top Myths regarding dog training have been explained by 14 of the Renowned Experts. Click to know, What experts have to say about myths.

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